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Between Colonialism and Diaspora: Sikh Cultural Formations in an Imperial World

£19.99

Author: Ballantyne, TonyBrand: Duke University PressEdition: IllustratedBinding: PaperbackFormat: IllustratedNumber Of Pages: 248Release Date: 16-08-2006Details: Product Description Bringing South Asian and British imperial history together with recent scholarship on transnationalism and postcolonialism, Tony Ballantyne offers a bold reevaluation of constructions of Sikh identity from the late eighteenth century through the early...

Author: Ballantyne, Tony

Brand: Duke University Press

Edition: Illustrated

Binding: Paperback

Format: Illustrated

Number Of Pages: 248

Release Date: 16-08-2006

Details: Product Description Bringing South Asian and British imperial history together with recent scholarship on transnationalism and postcolonialism, Tony Ballantyne offers a bold reevaluation of constructions of Sikh identity from the late eighteenth century through the early twenty-first. Ballantyne considers Sikh communities and experiences in Punjab, the rest of South Asia, the United Kingdom, and other parts of the world. He charts the shifting, complex, and frequently competing visions of Sikh identity that have been produced in response to the momentous social changes wrought by colonialism and diaspora. In the process, he argues that Sikh studies must expand its scope to take into account not only how Sikhism is figured in religious and political texts but also on the battlefields of Asia and Europe, in the streets of Singapore and Southall, and in the nightclubs of New Delhi and Newcastle. Constructing an expansive historical archive, Ballantyne draws on film, sculpture, fiction, and Web sites, as well as private papers, government records, journalism, and travel narratives. He proceeds from a critique of recent historiography on the development of Sikhism to an analysis of how Sikh identity changed over the course of the long nineteenth century. Ballantyne goes on to offer a reading of the contested interpretations of the life of Dalip Singh, the last Maharaja of Punjab. He concludes with an exploration of bhangra, a traditional form of Punjabi dance that diasporic artists have transformed into a globally popular music style. Much of bhangra’s recent evolution stems from encounters of the Sikh and Afro-Caribbean communities, particularly in the United Kingdom. Ballantyne contends that such cross-cultural encounters are central in defining Sikh identity both in Punjab and the diaspora. Review “ Between Colonialism and Diaspora is a major new work on Sikh history and culture. Tony Ballantyne has framed historical events and personalities within the broad context of transformations emerging from colonial rule. His treatment of Sikh memory and the past is provocative, and the final section on bhangra explores the broad implications of how a distinctly Punjabi cultural tradition has changed and in turn influenced international dance and music.”—N. Gerald Barrier, coeditor of Sikhism and History “Moving between the Punjab and Britain, Australia, and the United States, Between Colonialism and Diaspora tracks moments in the making of Sikh identities across imperial and postcolonial encounters, from military masculinities to bhangra, from the 1840s to the present. Tony Ballantyne is establishing himself as one of the most exciting voices amongst a new generation of historians.”—Catherine Hall, author of Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination, 1830–1867 “[A]n important addition to the growing literature on the construction of Sikh identity during the past two centuries. Unlike many writers, Ballantyne does not confine his analysis to either the colonial or the contemporary era but rather sees common threads running between them. . . . The result is a broader and more innovative understanding of Sikh cultural formations than is present in many standard accounts. . . . [A] bold and lively work.” Author: Ian Talbot, American Historical Review “One of the many strengths of the book is its wider application for imperial history; Sikh, diaspora, and gender studies; and transnationalism and postcolonialism. . . . The structure of the book is clear and accessible, topped and tailed with explanatory chapters that both frame the main themes and clarify the arguments made in the four main chapters or overlapping essays. . . . [I]ts real contribution lies in adding to and developing the comparatively limited historical scholarship on empire and mobility.” Author: Shompa Lahiri Source: Victorian Studies From the Author Tony Ballantyne is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Ota

Package Dimensions: 8.8 x 6.0 x 0.8 inches

Languages: English

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